Bronwen excels under pressure at Dean Farm

Working with sheep today was wet and extremely muddy, but Kay and Bronwen got the work done in style

We had a very busy day gathering sheep today. First, we moved a bunch of ewes along the lane to a new field, where they joined another flock and put them through the race for ultrasound scanning (to see how many lambs they're expecting).

Several ewes are facing Bronwen and staring at her, but she's simply lying on the ground, almost daring them to make a move

Kay did the road work and the gathering in the field, because she's so skilled, but I decided to use young Bronwen to put the ewes through the sorting race. It was a good decision too. Kay won't face an aggressive sheep, but Bronwen seems to love it. As you can see from the picture, with several ewes trying to "stare her down" she simply lay down quite relaxed and looked back at them.

Bronwen's excellent in these situations. In the past she's been a bit to quick to attack the sheep for no reason, but she's far better now and will only attack if a ewe tries to attack her first.

Bronwen standing in the corner of the yard with several ewes facing her, very close, but she's not intimidated by them.

Once at Dean Farm, there seemed to be liquid mud everywhere. One of the railway bridges on the farm is under repair, and the contractors are making a terrible mess. After Kay had gathered the first bunch of sheep, I put her back in the 4x4 to conserve her energy and once again, used Bronwen to push the sheep through the race for scanning.

Bronwen was simply superb, quietly weaving back and forth behind the sheep to keep them up to the sorting race. The picture above has two powerful messages. First, I can trust Bronwen to bring the sheep up through the race by herself now. This leaves me free to help at the sorting or scanning end of the race with little tasks like making sure the sheep are moving steadily along the race and not getting jammed up.

The picture also demonstrates Bronwen's courage. The sheep are mothers-to-be and they don't like having dogs around, let alone being moved around by a dog. Make no mistake, the ewes in the picture are threatening Bronwen. They mean business, but once again she's simply staring back at them with her head up. I do like a dog which works with its head up, because that's a confident dog. People love to see dogs with their head right down near the ground when they work sheep, and I agree, it looks stylish, but in my opinion a dog which works that way is nervous...

Close up of a sheep's face. This ewe was very strong-willed

After this bunch of sheep were scanned, I used Bronwen to return them to their field, and then used her to gather the next bunch. It didn't go as well as it would have if Kay had done it, but Bronwen's not going to learn to gather sheep well while she's sitting in the back of the car. She got the job done reasonably well, and I'm sure she'll to better next time.

Close up of a ewe in the sorting race, sporting an attractive hairstyle

When the sheep were going through the sorting race, I spotted this one with a distinctive "hair do". John always buys lots of different types of sheep, and I love the variety. The sheep in the picture above this one, is distinctive because she was a remarkably strong-willed and physically tough ewe. You can see by her face that she's got determination and she proved it today, but Bronwen was tougher!


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Young Victor on a frosty morning

Even though it's cold, the weather's glorious!

There's nothing quite like a bit of sunlight to brighten up a frosty morning and Victor's morning was certainly made brighter by the prospect of some training with these sheep. He's a lovely young dog, with a natural instinct for going round the sheep rather than charging at them. Dogs with this instinct are usually far easier to train than their wilder counterparts.

Rough coated tri colour border collie aged three months
A favourite with visitors to this website, Mew must be one of the fluffiest dogs we've owned

Mew continues to impress us, both with her amazingly fluffy coat, and her personality. How she'll turn out as a herding dog we've yet to see, but she certainly has plenty of self confidence. That's a very good start.


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