CQA – The Outrun Tutorial Comments

Sheepdog training tutorials - the outrun

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Cover pic of The Outrun (Part 2) Sheepdog Training Tutorial

Outrun ( 1 | 2 )

The outrun marks the difference between a dog in training and a dog in work. When you no longer need to walk to your sheep, but can send the dog away to gather and bring them to you, you'll have a real sense of achievement - and a really useful sheepdog.
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36 thoughts on “CQA – The Outrun Tutorial Comments”

  1. Hi Andy I’ve got my dog doing lovely 300 even 400 meter out runs with me between her and the sheep,but how do I take myself from being something to run around to being back in control.you haven’t explained how you do that cheers steve

    1. If your dog can manage 300 metres with you standing somewhere in the middle Steven, I’m sure she can manage to do a shorter distance if you send her off from alongside you.
      If she crosses over, you’re sending her too far.

      1. So your saying once she has the outrun which is nice and wide,send her away from my side gradually building up the distance.

        1. Steven, Every dog is different, but as a general rule, when you start to teach the dog to do outruns, it’s useful to keep the distance as short as possible and stand in front of the dog when you send it off. Once the dog is doing a good outrun (and stopping on the point of balance) gradually build up the distance.
          As the distance increases, move a little closer to the dog before you send it off – until eventually, you can send the dog off from beside your legs. If the dog starts to come in tight or cross over, reduce the distance – or move to a point between the dog and the sheep where you can push the dog out wider. (Watch the Outrun Tutorials again – it’s all in there)!

    2. Hi Andy me again,need some advice about the maltese cross entering a novice trial 21’st September been looking on the net for videos how to do it cant find any, any tips please cheers

      1. Hello Steven,
        Sorry about the late reply – I accidentally overlooked your question.
        To be honest, I’ve never competed in a trial with a Maltese Cross, but I know it’s very similar to the pen – except that you put the sheep through whichever “chute” the judge dictates, and then bring them round and put them through the other part of the chute at right-angles to the first. Again whichever way the judge dictates before the start of the trial.
        Of course, the sheep must pass straight through and not spill out of the sides – and the handler can stand wherever they want to.
        I strongly recommend you arrive early and watch several runs before you have a go with your dog!
        I hope this helps.

  2. Hi Andy all your sheep follow you so I think they are dogged big time mine are proper hill sheep so how do I get my dog around these sheep which have never been dogged do I buy a few dogged sheep to train her with first ? Or do I drive her in to these ewes hard and get them to respect her shes willing to do that for me .

    1. Hello Steven,
      I strongly recommend you get a few dogged sheep to start your dog off with. Trying to train with flighty sheep is like learning to drive in a racing car!
      Once the dog’s flanking wide and will stop well on command, it should be able to handle the flighty sheep without too much problem.

      1. Thanks Andy took your advice on board,and she’s doing great but how long would you leave it before you took her out on the hill to undogged sheep.got to be honest I tried it yesterday and all went wrong my fault I know she’s only 12 months old this coming Saturday I think I’m trying to run be I can walk thanks again

        1. I’m glad that was of help, Steven.
          Once your dog can manage the “dogged” sheep, it’s a good idea to mix a few of the “flightier” ones in with them – hopefully this will make the dogged ones a little more lively, but not so lively as the main flock you were trying to train with before.
          If she’s OK with these, mix a few more of the lively sheep in – and so on.

  3. Andy,
    I feel much more confident now when working the sheep. My dogs are easier to work with also. Gradually, but surely improving.
    I have sent two messages to your Comment page.
    Your website is such a great training help.
    Yvonne
    Kate and Choco.

  4. Hello Diana,
    Thank you for your comments and questions.

    I wanted to post this question in the “Give the Sheep Some Space” area, but couldn’t figure out how to do it.
    We’re gradually moving tutorial comments to dedicated pages for each tutorial – please bear with us – some are already done, others will be completed soon.

    I have a 1.5 year old BC that was late to training due to a broken knee.
    Eighteen months old is not really late – some trainers don’t start training their dogs until they’re two.

    After a few months of intermittent training he is now doing wonderfully but keeps the sheep too close to me. I feel like I am a member of the flock!
    You need to practice walking back with the sheep between you and the dog – MAKE him stay back. It’s excellent practice for the dog – teaching it to give the sheep some space, and it improves the dog’s stop too.
    The rule is, if the sheep are around your legs, the dog’s too close. There’s some coverage of it in the “Give the Sheep Space” Tutorial.
    (You need to be logged-in to use this link).

    It can be very tedious to make a stubborn dog stay back, but once he accepts it, training will be much easier.

  5. Andy,

    Hello from California in the U.S.!

    I wanted to post this question in the “Give the Sheep Some Space” area, but couldn’t figure out how to do it. This seemed like the next best place.

    I have a 1.5 year old BC that was late to training due to a broken knee. After a few months of intermittent training he is now doing wonderfully but keeps the sheep too close to me. I feel like I am a member of the flock!

    I think he is just trying to do an extra good job at keeping our prey nearby and may lack some confidence in my abilities. I don’t dispute the appropriateness of that.

    He does well when practicing flanking, maybe slightly close but not bad at all for his level of training. And when I bury myself behind the sheep on a fence to try to teach him an out command, he correctly stays quite far away.

    But when we take a stroll with the sheep, up he comes and I am in a stampede. Sometimes I turn and move toward him to correct the behavior, but that only seems to work if I walk backwards constantly. I try circling into him and he will move out, but I keep having to do that and our forward progress looks like a Slinky toy!

    Fortunately I am working with docile sheep, but I don’t know whether to just keep working on his confidence or instead if there is something else I should consider doing,

    I am wondering if you could make a video on the “out” command. Also, of course, advice would be welcome.

    Thank you.

    Diana

    1. Hello Diana,
      Thank you for your comments and questions.

      I wanted to post this question in the “Give the Sheep Some Space” area, but couldn’t figure out how to do it.

      We’re gradually moving tutorial comments to dedicated pages for each tutorial – please bear with us – some are already done, others will be completed soon.

      I have a 1.5 year old BC that was late to training due to a broken knee.

      Eighteen months old is not really late – some trainers don’t start training their dogs until they’re two.

      After a few months of intermittent training he is now doing wonderfully but keeps the sheep too close to me. I feel like I am a member of the flock!

      You need to practice walking back with the sheep between you and the dog – MAKE him stay back. It’s excellent practice for the dog – teaching it to give the sheep some space, and it improves the dog’s stop too.
      The rule is, if the sheep are around your legs, the dog’s too close. There’s some coverage of it in the Give the Sheep Space Tutorial.
      (You need to be logged-in to use this link).

      It can be very tedious to make a stubborn dog stay back, but once he accepts it, training will be much easier.

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